hate speech

At times, even public figures or the representatives of authoritites make statements that contain hate speech. These utterances can have much graver effects and consequences than the statements of average citizens, because they reach a wider circle of people, and serve as a standard for the wider groups of society. The judge of the Court of Gyula rejected the request for the ban of the radical ‘For a Better Future Association’ (Szebb Jövőért Egyesület) with the reasoning that the Roma, attacked by the organisation, are „characterised by a lifestyle of avoiding work, and morals that lack the respect of private property and the norms of community co-existence”. The activism carried out by CFCF was a reaction to the racist statement of judge Erika Mucsi. With the use of various communication tools and by activating citizens they have managed to achieve that the National Committee of Judicial Ethics have declared the words and the judicial practice of the judge unethical.

When cars became more and more common a hundred years ago, many things had to be reconsidered and rearranged. Today the world of the internet creates numerous challenges that we have not faced before. Our child may become a victim while sitting in the safety of his or her room, alone and quiet; anonymous strangers may badmouth any of us; and the shared contents of anyone may reach thousands. Many parents and teachers would be likely to respond to the dangers of the internet with prohibition. However, making a responsible decision through informing ourselves of the potential gains and risks is a much better solution than prohibition. Because the same way as there is no gain without risks, there are no functionable democracies without curious and responsible citizens either. Thanks to Hope to the Children Association (Reményt a Gyermekeknek Egyesület), Bookmarks (Böngésző), a publication that supports the work of teachers and other youth workers by providing information on the theory and practice of recognising and handling internet harrasment and hate speech has been published in Hungarian. 

On 22 July the Council of Europe’s No Hate Speech Movement organises a European action day to commemorate and support victims of hate crime.

The EEA and Norway Grants have entered into a strategic partnership with the Council of Europe to promote tolerance and fundamental rights. Activities countering hatred are encouraged through the EEA NGO programmes.